Safety and Security in Emergency Situations

Most of us expect our workplaces to be safe and secure, and most of them are. There are some circumstances, however, when unexpected events may not have been sufficiently planned for. Our safety and security is the responsibility of the employer, but all employees also have some responsibility for their own and their co-workers' safety. This week's articles discuss a number of issues for which you might need additional planning.

Here's what to do if an active shooter enters your workplace. (Item #1)     When large crowds gather outside your work environment, individuals inside may be at risk if the event spirals out of control. (Item #2)     Here's what to do before and during a bomb threat. (Item #3)    

Do you have a plan for when the power goes out unexpectedly? You should. (Item #4)     The key to a safe workplace is having effective safety and security policies in place and to communicate these policies to all employees. (Item #5)     It's not necessarily the crisis, but how an organization responds that people will remember. (Item #6)    

As always, I look forward to hearing about your concerns with regard to business continuity. If there are any topics that you'd like to see covered, email me at bmellinger@attainium.net.

Bob Mellinger, President
Attainium Corp



1. Active Shooter Emergency Planning

The threat of an active shooter is a possibility anywhere. But as with any crisis situation, preparation and planning can help to minimize chaos and injury. Establishing an active shooter protocol, and communicating that plan to your tenants and employees, is critical. Here's what your plan should contain.
http://www.alliedbarton.com/Resources-for-You/Security-Awareness-Tips/View-Security-Awareness-Tip/ArticleId/56/Active-Shooter-Emergency-Planning


2. Demonstration Preparedness: Is Your Business Ready?

The approaching Democratic and Republican National Conventions, and other large-scale events, should have business leaders on alert. Regardless of the motivation, intention or political affiliation of demonstrators, the potential for increased pedestrian and vehicle traffic requires an organization's keen attention, before, during and after an event in order to keep everyone safe.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bill-whitmore/business-emergency-preparedness_b_1822314.html


3. How to Handle a Bomb Threat

The director of security at a manufacturing plant finds a suspicious package lying in the middle of a break area. The management office at a large shopping mall receives a phone call that a bomb has been planted somewhere in the five-acre facility. A hotel employee discovers a note taped to a guest room door indicating that there's a bomb inside. Is the device a fake? The call a hoax? Or is it a terrorist plot?
http://www.csoonline.com/article/2122154/emergency-preparedness/how-to-handle-a-bomb-threat.html


4. Checklist for Dealing with Workplace Power Interruptions

A power outage can amount to much more than just a brief inconvenience. It can create safety issues that workers may not recognize unless they have been told to expect them. Consider these questions to identify and plan for possible hazards that can arise from power failures.
http://ehsdailyadvisor.blr.com/2013/10/checklist-for-dealing-with-workplace-power-interruptions/


5. A Quick Reference Guide for Workplace Safety and Security

For businesses of all sizes, knowing how to protect yourself, your property and your assets is crucial. In an age when anything can happen, anywhere, at any time, we should all be prepared to handle any situation. This takes real awareness of planning and diligence to stay on task. With so much at stake, AlliedBarton has compiled this handbook for small and large businesses, as well as families and individuals.
http://www.boma.org/education/classroom-learning/Documents/Online%20Appendix/Workplace-Violence-Safety.pdf


6. 10 leadership tips for engaging employees in the safety process

Special events raise awareness about vital causes and raise funds to cover some of the costs of service delivery. They can be as simple as a small open house or as large as a major sporting event. Making the decision to have an event involves certain risk. Not planning ahead can have a huge impact on your reputation and financial stability. While there's no way to know exactly what might come up, you need to consider the "what if" possibilities and identify what measures you will take to mitigate risk.
http://www.ishn.com/articles/86273-10-leadership-tips-for-engaging-employees-in-the-safety-process


Quote of the Week:

"Work injuries and illnesses can affect every aspect of life for workers and their families."

-- Maine Department of Labor

Contact Us:

Attainium Corp
571.248.8200
www.attainium.net